Links 4/07

I hope you had a lovely Saturday. I took a forty minute detour to claim a vegan cinnamon roll, visited the Louvre’s special Delacroix exhibition, and ate a pizza (also vegan).
Keep an eye open for an upcoming ‘best vegan pizzas in Paris’ post. The sequel to the Boston edition- we’ve relocated.

So here’s what’s happening on the interwebs, carefully avoiding the trend for snorting condoms.

  • The city of lights from the sky
  • I’m fantasizing less about these outfits and more about the swoon worthy descriptions of spring weather
  • Body glitter is now the only appropriate use for the Kira Kira filter. I am entranced.
  • What happens when you add illustrations to those random snippets of overheard conversations
  • I would stay here– books and beds are the only things I need in life
  • For it to really be Paris he would have an accordion
  • Infernal Affairs and The Departed– for me The Departed wins because Boston, but I have yet to see Infernal Affairs (it’s been on my list SO LONG) so that’s not worth much. It does look excellent, doesn’t it?
  • If you’re a Royal Wedding fan, maybe you want to enter this social media contest to suggest its defining ice cream flavor?
  • The unstoppable rise of veganism, about which I have mixed feelings (more people want to eat my cinnamon bun but more places sell vegan pizza).
  • The benefits of a plant-based diet for health and the environment.
  • Congrats to Yale and congrats to Nathan Chen.
  • An interview with my favorite makeup artist
  • A follow up on the Orientalism inherent in Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs, and in the broader world of American cinema (with a very interesting segment on 2015’s Met Gala theme).
    “It’s Japan purely as an aesthetic — and another piece of art that treats the East not as a living, breathing half of the planet but as a mirror for the Western imagination.” And perhaps the only thing that will lead to a more fair, just, and equal portrayal of Asians in cinema and pop culture is the spending power of that huge sector of the world population.
  • Turkish Rondo in finger snaps
  • Molly Ringwald reflects on the problematic legacy of John Hughes movies in the era of #MeToo
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Books I Read Over Break

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As this is my last full day in Boston and also a blizzard day (16-18″!), and as I have no books left from the library (I had to go back and cancel my extra holds yesterday 😥 ) this list isn’t going to go through any alterations before the actual end of the break tomorrow around 7 pm (at which point I will be at the airport) (unless I finish The Sun and Her Flowers by Rupi Kaur SUPER QUICKLY), I can get away with posting this a bit prematurely.

I have packed my bags and read my last book.

  • The Secret Lives of Color, Kassia St. Clair: An excellent and really interesting book about the histories of various culturally significant colors (like Mountbatten Pink, Lead White, Cerulean, et al.) featuring odd and various anecdotes from the past.  Each color discussed gets a few pages.  Very far from dry, perfect for increasing your store of random information for use at parties and family gatherings, and a very aesthetically pleasing book.
  • Wild Things: The Joy of Reading Children’s Literature as an Adult, Bruce Handy: I’m a huge children’s lit reader. Possibly more so than I was as a child (and that’s saying something).  Watching the author discuss and examine childhood favorites (Goodnight Moon, Peter Rabbit, Green Eggs and Ham) through an adult lens, with an attention to various social/cultural movements, is so fascinating. It doesn’t hurt that the author is really witty. I think I audibly chuckled a few times.
  • The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down, Hyemin Sunim: Part of what inspired my very crunchy and zen resolution list (the other part being that I’m just a crunchy and zen person) (well, I try to be zen).  Beautiful illustrations and lots of crunchy and chewy food for thought. So glad I stumbled on this in Shakespeare and Co. (And so glad BPL carries it!)

Contrary to my usual preferences, if was a very nonfiction-heavy vacation.  But I feel edified, improved, and most importantly full of odd anecdotes to share.

Links from the USA

Happy Christmas Eve Eve! I arrived home yesterday afternoon and am super jet lagged and being treated to a very New England ice storm.

It’s excellent.  We’re going to see The Last Jedi tonight and I think my excitement will be such that I will stay awake.  I’ve heard lots of interesting things about it but have so far avoided any spoilers.

I have a healthy (and scented!) collection of links this week!

The year-end photo compendiums are coming in, here are two favorites…

On the fashion front:

And the more miscellaneous:

How to Gently Assert Your Dominance Over Confirmed Tourists

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On the streets of a city like Boston, you run into a lot of different things. Here’s how to 1) tell if what you’ve encountered is a tourist, and 2) gently assert your dominance over and superiority to it if it is.
Because you’re a local.

Note: This guide can also, with minor modifications, be applied to other areas with touristy inclinations. Continue reading “How to Gently Assert Your Dominance Over Confirmed Tourists”

Boston-ish Restaurants At Which I Want to Eat

Over the past few years, I haven’t been a big one for eating out. 1) Anorexia obsessiveness has made it difficult, 2) I love cooking and eating homemade food, and 3) veganism. But that’s all changed recently and I’ve gotten a sudden yen to explore the Boston area food scene.

The first symptom was probably my desire to do the much more delicious version of a pub crawl- my vegan pizza tour of the Greater Boston area. Which was super successful and very yummy.
And then this past weekend my grandparents were visiting, and in the hopes of finding that rare restaurant that they would like and my parents and I could eat at, I fell down the rabbit hole of Boston’s vegan Yelp sector. Continue reading “Boston-ish Restaurants At Which I Want to Eat”

Thoughts on Boston’s Counter Protest

In the wake of the events at Charlottesville, many cities this past weekend had their own similar marches. Boston was one of these, with a march planned (scheduled before the Charlottesville incident (incident= grotesque pro-white supremacy speech, violence, etc.)) in support of ‘free speech’.
The quotes are included because many of the scheduled speakers had ties to white supremacist and nationalist groups. The Massachusetts Chapter of the KKK was also planning to attend (according to a statement made by the national KKK).

There’s been a lot of discussion about what happened in Boston yesterday, and having been there I would like to throw my own two cents in. Especially as President Trump is making what are, in my mind, unfounded criticisms of the counter protesters (my group) as anti-police agitators.

So, in bullet form, my not very gathered thoughts. Continue reading “Thoughts on Boston’s Counter Protest”

My Kindergarten Bookshelf

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Alternative title: Picture Books to Raise a Child Like Me

When I was a young girl my bookshelf was an open night table with one shelf. It was painted a very Goodnight Moon-lurid red brown and it’s now used to house some of Mom’s textiles in the nursery-turned-‘sewing room’.
You know, I never really realized until now that I had a nursery. I moved out of a smaller bedroom into the room I’m currently in now because I was getting to big for the first one. I think that makes it a nursery? How weird.

I remember the books I liked best very well. Partly because I only recently managed to let go of them and partly because I’ve rebought some of my old favorites. Because you never know when you’re going to up and have a baby, and you never know when said baby will demand reading material. Continue reading “My Kindergarten Bookshelf”