Books Via Movies

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There’s a popular bit of wisdom that holds “the book is always better than the movie”- with which I must respectfully differ.  Many landmark films come from meh reading material (The Godfather, Jaws, Rear Window, Rosemary’s Baby, etc.)
Granted, if you are eagerly awaiting a movie franchise of a book series already beloved, you’re doomed to be disappointed.  It’s hard- if not impossible- to fall in love with someone else’s vision of something when you already have your own.

Many of the books I’ve sought out on the strength of a film have been disappointing.  Frankly, some stories are better suited to print and others seem made to be made into films.

But then there have also been times that I have felt very much rewarded in seeking out a movie’s source material. These books are generally a little different than my usual reading material (well-known and older novels)- in a way that makes them particularly suited to summer.  They’re generally shorter and quicker, a bit less thoughtful, a bit more action-driven.
My favorite books found via their movies are below, and arranged by genre: Continue reading “Books Via Movies”

Yé-yé, It’s Summer!

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Music for me movies in seasons, and incidentally every summer I find myself straying away from the top of the charts and toward music that fits my one part relaxed, one part nostalgic mood.
One genre that I return to year after year is yé-yé music (henceforth called ye-ye because I’m too lazy to deal with the accent aigu repeatedly), a genre of music, mainly French- but also from Italy, Spain, and Portugal- that was popular in the 1960s.  It’s basically the continental version of American 60s surf music (of which I’m also very fond).

So this will be mainly French (because prior to writing this I had no idea the style included other countries and I am now planning and thrilling at the prospect of the impromptu research I get to do and music I get to find!) Continue reading “Yé-yé, It’s Summer!”

Friday Links 6/23: The Drought is Over

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I had an emotionally trying day, so let’s turn to the profound depths of the endless internet to drown my troubles.

Thankfully, after two weeks of fairly few links, I stumbled this week across a lot of interesting things (hope you’ll agree!) Continue reading “Friday Links 6/23: The Drought is Over”

Pre-Perfumista Fragrances

(Don’t Laught at Me)

If you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time, you’ll know that one of my passions is for perfume.  To the extent that I hope to follow a career in flavor and fragrance chemistry.  This really got triggered sometime around 8th or 9th grade, when I bought what I think of as my first ‘perfumista’ fragrance- L’Air de Rien, by Miller Harris.  L’Air de Rien isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, as it combines musk, patchouli, vanilla, oaks, and orange blossom to get a scent that ultimately feels very sexy and ‘lived in’ (or like a cupcake in a stable, if you’re my mum).
Apparently in 2006, Jane Birkin commissioned Miller Harris to create a perfume smelling “a little of my brother’s hair, my father’s pipe, floor polish, empty chest of drawers, old forgotten houses.”
I’ve never smelled Jane Birkin’s brother’s hair, but I think MH was pretty much on target.
And then my interest in perfume really kicked into high gear in 10th grade, when I started swapping samples.

So that’s the not very necessary backstory, which was really more just an excuse to reminisce over the start of my long-enduring marriage to L’Air de Rien (sorry!).  But even if that’s really what I think of as the event that initiated me into perfumista-hood, that doesn’t mean I never wore perfume before hand. Because I did. And I’m not too proud to remember. Continue reading “Pre-Perfumista Fragrances”

The Seven Deadly Seagulls

I’m absolutely exhausted this evening so I’m going to take advantage of someone else’s hard work and bring you the imaginitive art of Jamie Wyeth- in particular a series of paintings in which he personified the seven deadly sins as especially sinful seagulls.

Read more about the cycle of paintings here. Continue reading “The Seven Deadly Seagulls”

There is no T in Feminism

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The last few Fashion Weeks, the political became… fashionable?  Mostly as exemplified by an army of models in slogan tees.  At Dior, Maria Grazia Chiuri sent women out dresses in a uniform of navy and midnight colors, French military-style leather berets, and t-shirts stating ‘WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS” (caps the decision of the t-shirt designer, not my own). Parable Gurung created a line of tees with slogans like “The future is female” and “Nevertheless she persisted” (I love you Elizabeth Warren) among them. Continue reading “There is no T in Feminism”